An analysis of the novel the handmaid s tale by margaret atwood

Rather, it blends a number of approaches and formats in a radical departure from predictable sci-fi or thriller fiction or feminist literature. As a modern-day Cassandra, Offred seems emotionally and spiritually compelled to tell her story, if only to relieve the ennui of her once nun-like existence and to touch base with reality.

An analysis of the novel the handmaid s tale by margaret atwood

Share via Email This year sees the 25th anniversary of the publication of Margaret Atwood's dystopian classic, and to honour the occasion, the book has been reissued by Vintage. The Handmaid's Tale tells the story of Offred — not her real name, but the patronymic she has been given by the new regime in an oppressive parallel America of the future — and her role as a Handmaid.

An analysis of the novel the handmaid s tale by margaret atwood

The Handmaids are forced to provide children by proxy for infertile women of a higher social status, the wives of Commanders. They undergo regular medical tests, and in many ways become invisible, the sum total of their biological parts.

Offred remembers her life before the inception of Gilead, when she had a husband, a daughter and a life. She had been a witness to the dissolution of the old America into the totalitarian theocracy that it now is, and she tries to reconcile the warning signs with reality: Her former life is presented through glimpses of her university friends, her husband, her freedom.

They are shadowy memories made all the more indistinct by Atwood's lyrical prose, in which facts appear to merge into one another, and history appears immaterial; Offred is kept alive by her inner life, and reality and history become a kind of symbiotic mirage.

Fiercely political and bleak, yet witty and wise, the novel won the inaugural Arthur C Clarke award inbut Atwood has always maintained that the novel is not classifiable science fiction. Nothing practised in the Republic of Gilead is genuinely futuristic.

She is right, and this novel seems ever more vital in the present day, where women in many parts of the world live similar lives, dictated by biological determinism and misogyny.The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood is a brilliant, endearing, scary as hell book. Told with simplistic prose and stark attention to detail, Atwood describes life in the not too distant future where the United States has been transformed through military coup into a totalitarian theocracy/5.

Offred is a Handmaid in the Republic of Gilead, a totalitarian and theocratic state that has replaced the United States of America. Because of dangerously low reproduction rates, Handmaids are assigned to bear children for elite couples that have trouble conceiving.

Mar 10,  · Margaret Atwood is the author of more than 20 works of fiction. “The Handmaid’s Tale” will be released by Hulu as a part television series in April, and this essay is the introduction to the new Anchor paperback edition to be published on April When asked whether The Handmaid's Tale is about to "come true", I remind myself that there are two futures in the book, and that if the first one comes true, the second one may do so also.

A one-of-a-kind tour de force, Margaret Atwood's futuristic The Handmaid's Tale refuses categorization into a single style, slant, or genre. Rather, it blends a number of approaches and formats in a radical departure from predictable sci-fi or thriller fiction or feminist literature. Unlock the more straightforward side of The Handmaid’s Tale with this concise and insightful summary and analysis!

This engaging summary presents an analysis of The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, which follows a young woman named Offred (the Handmaid of the title), who lives in the repressive Republic of Gilead and whose sole role is to conceive children for the powerful .

SparkNotes: The Handmaid’s Tale: Plot Overview